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DEVELOPING A PHILOSOPHY FOR SUCCESS

PHILOSOPHY - your values and beliefs

It is virtually impossible to be successful in the field of education without having formulated a personal teaching philosophy. This philosophy, based on a lifetime of personal experiences and observations, should serve as the foundation for your ability to achieve success. It should be noted that not every teacher selects music as their subject matter. What all teachers do share however, is the wonderful opportunity to include "lessons of life" as part of their daily classes. Therefore, what you value as being important, and what you believe in, should certainly be a reflection of your approach to teaching both music and the commonly accepted ideals of citizenship.

A FIVE STEP APPROACH TO DEVELOPING A SUCCESSFUL PHILOSOPHY

  1. Start the process of developing a successful philosophy by observing the people around you. (find the best role-models/master teachers that are available)
  2. Being able to communicate your philosophy is an absolute necessity.
  3. Remember, anything good takes time to develop.
  4. You must be the role-model of your own philosophy.
  5. Always be prepared to change and adjust your philosophy.

 

PHILOSOPHY OF AN OUTSTANDING REHEARSAL

  • An outstanding rehearsal starts with an outstanding teacher. The educational attitude that is reflected on the podium will have a tremendous impact on the success or failure of the conductor’s rehearsal time.
  • An outstanding rehearsal starts with an outstanding musician. A thorough knowledge of music, as it pertains to musical performance, is an attribute that every conductor should possess.
  • An outstanding rehearsal is well organized and planned in advance. Avoid doing your homework on the podium.

Failing to plan means you are planning to fail.

  • An outstanding rehearsal can be achieved if your "people" skills will allow you to relate to your students in a highly positive manner.

Remember, your students won’t care how much you know until they know how much you care.




James Swearingen
Capital University Conservatory of Music
www.JamesSwearingen.com
© 1999